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Posts Tagged ‘Pharaoh’

Exodus 2:21 reads “Then Moses was content to live with the man, and he gave Zipporah his daughter to Moses.” 

As you read the following, you’ll have to hum the tune and imagine Mick Jagger’s voice singing the chorus from one of The Rolling Stones’ greatest hits:  “(I Can’t Get No) Satisfaction” (lyrics below courtesy of http://www.lyricfind.com)

“I can’t get no satisfaction, I can’t get no satisfaction
‘Cause I try and I try and I try and I try
I can’t get no, I can’t get no”

The gist of the song is one familiar to most people.  No matter how hard someone tries in their own power, they can’t get the satisfaction they crave.  Whether it be power, money, fame, influence…it’s all in vain.  Solomon spoke of this in Ecclesiastes “All is vanity (vain)”.  I mused about the word “content” one day not too long ago.  When one thinks of being content or contentment, I think of the image of the sheep…content as long as it has food, water, and protection.  I felt led to research the word “content” in the Holy Bible and see where and how it was used. Now, this is not every use of the word, but the ones I felt led by God to think on.  So I hope He blesses you in these thoughts and that…you’ll be content. 🙂 

So, let’s start with Exodus and the story of Moses.  After he had been banished by Pharaoh and had wandered the desert, he came to the aid of some Midianite shepherd women.  When they told their father of what he had done, he bade them go get him and bring him to their house. Exodus 2:21 reads “Then Moses was content to live with the man, and he gave Zipporah his daughter to Moses.”  Moses had gone from regal surroundings to bare survival, and now had found welcome by this man’s family.  He now had food, water, shelter, and even a wife and later a son.  I think I’d be happy, too, to come off that roller coaster better off than how I’d been.

How about you, Christian?  Are you happy with what God has given you?  No matter the quantity, all we have comes from the Lord Himself.

Something to think about!

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Verses 27-30: “And in these days prophets came from Jerusalem to Antioch. Then one of them, named Agabus, stood up and showed by the Spirit that there was going to be a great famine throughout all the world, which also happened in the days of Claudius Caesar. Then the disciples, each according to his ability, determined to send relief to the brethren dwelling in Judea. This they also did, and sent it to the elders by the hands of Barnabas and Saul.”

In Genesis 41, we are in the middle of Joseph’s incredible journey into Egypt, as God used him in a way no one could ever see coming. Pharaoh had a dream (a vision, you could say), sent by God, and no one could interpret it. God opened the door for Joseph to be the deliverer of the vision’s meaning; a period of great harvest in the land, followed by a period of great famine. After Joseph proposed a plan of action to Pharaoh, Pharaoh made Joseph the second-most powerful leader in Egypt to head up the program to save the populace from famine.

Flash forward to today’s verse: another vision, this one given to the prophet Agabus. Again, it’s a vision of a coming famine. The disciples (after prayer and discussion, I’m sure) determined to send relief; what we would call a “love offering” today. This gift would help the home church back in Jerusalem.

The story of Joseph came to mind when I read the above verses; here are some parallels from both stories that God revealed to me, that are true today:
1. God does give advance warning of future events, if we are listening. In both cases, God gave visions of the upcoming famines. To coin an old idiom, “forewarned is forearmed”. Like the recent tornado outbreaks we’ve had, the first thing we did was turn on the television, and get the information from the local weatherman as to where the storm may go…this allowed us to be ready. However, we had to listen and to pay attention to the signs (the forecast predictions). The messenger may be different, but God is in control.
2. God provides a way out of trouble. If anyone could echo this statement’s truth, it was Joseph! Seems our problem today is, we sometimes don’t want to use God’s “escape plan”, due to selfish reasons or stubborn pride. However, that doesn’t deny that the way out is there.
3. God uses His people to be part of the rescue. In Genesis, it was Joseph. In Acts here, it was a gift from Antioch to Jerusalem. Today, God uses those who are willing to be used by Him, to be part of the solution, not the problem.

Just as in the past, so it is in the present, and true even in the future. God is in control.

Something to think about.

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